History & Hops a Great Success

On October 21, the first annual “History & Hops”, presented by the Chatham Historical Society, was held at the Chatham Fish & Game Club. The club was transformed into a traditional beer garden complete with bushes and sparkling lights.

Amy Crandall, event chair, welcomed the sell-out crowd and thanked local sponsors DeFalco Automotive & Towing and Twin Elephant Brewing Company.

Chatham grew and thrived around Day’s Tavern which once sat by the Passaic River on Main Street. The organizers expanded on the tavern theme to celebrate Chatham’s past with hops.

The guests enjoyed beer from Ireland, Great Britain, Germany and Belgium. Each beer represented an historical Chatham person or place including Irish immigrants who came in the mid-1850s to escape Ireland’s Great Potato Famine and Sheppard Kollack who founded north Jersey’s first newspaper at the site where Sheppard Kollack Park is today.

Hors d’oeuvres and sandwiches were served as well as a selection of wines from France and Italy. The entertainment was provided by Chatham’s own “Sal Arnuk, Mike McLaughlin and Chris “Sarge” Tomaino Unplugged”.

The gathering was attended by adults of all ages who came to enjoy great beer and to socialize while learning a bit of local history, with many of them hoping this will be an annual event. “We are so happy there is such interest and enthusiasm in our event. Mark your calendar for next year.” said Society president, Helen Ann Rosenfeld. 

Photo: Committee members left to right - Christine Grobert, Kathleen Sims, Amy Crandall, Helen Ann Rosenfeld, Joyce Martinsen, Cheryl Leverich, Karen Hoerrner

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Post date: April 5, 2017

The society hosted a well-attended spring program on April 2nd at the Library of the Chathams. Janet W. Foster, an architectural historian and historic preservation consultant, led a group of over 60 people through a wonderful presentation on the history late 19th Century American Architecture.

Next Events:

June 10, 2017
 
 
In France during the Great War, five Chatham Borough men lost their lives. In 1919, their sacrifice was honored by the planting of five red oak trees on the grounds of Public School #1, now Chatham Borough Hall. Sadly none remain.